About a month or so ago I began participating in an ongoing patient research study about RA called YourCareMoments. How it works is I basically fill out a short survey after each time I see my rheumatologist or get RA prescriptions filled at the pharmacy or have any kind of RA-related treatment. The feedback from the surveys is then used by YourCareMoments to help inform pharmaceutical companies about what’s going on with patients who have RA–their experiences and opinions regarding doctor appointments, getting their RA medications, starting new medications. I do receive a small monetary compensation each time I complete a survey (about $6-7 per survey), which is nice, but what I really like about the program is that pharmaceutical companies are getting feedback directly from the patients who use their products. I think this is one good way to help bridge the gap that exists between patients and the huge pharmaceutical industry (which often has a bad reputation for not being very patient-friendly).

The pharmaceutical companies need to hear from patients and hear what the experiences are in their daily lives living with RA. Because RA is such an unpredictable and ever-changing disease, and it’s very specific from person to person, I believe it’s important for as many voices to be heard as possible, and that’s why I support this program. I want pharma to know what it’s like when I have my rheumatology appointments. I want them to know the hassle I sometimes have trying to get certain medications. They need to know that access to care and treatment and medications is often very difficult for RA patients. So! I want to let you, my readers, know that I’m participating in this program and I would like to extend a friendly invitation to anybody else who has RA who would also like to participate. So far I’ve had nothing but good experiences taking the surveys and working with YourCareMoments. It’s easy, convenient, and fast–I recommend getting involved if you have a few extra minutes to spare each week/month.

You can register to start receiving surveys by going here:

www.yourcaremoments.com

Please contact Keith Olsen (who is extremely nice and helpful!) if you have any questions about participating:

Keith Olsen
Contact@YourCareMoments.com

Here are some quick facts and FAQs about the YourCareMoments program:

YourCareMoments

Zitter Health Insights is a specialized business intelligence firm that provides insights to biopharmaceutical manufacturers and health insurance companies related to the affordability of and access to medications. The project, YourCareMoments, provides insights into consumer habits, decisions and health care experiences. This is done through short online surveys that are sent to registered patients. Once they register, emails are sent with links to participate in the surveys.  Surveys average about 5-10 minutes to complete and participants are paid per survey.  The surveys can be completed on your computer or mobile device. YourCareMoments keeps in contact with each participant over time to follow when he/she will next see a doctor or pick up a prescription in order to survey the participants while the information is still fresh in their minds.  Also, these are anonymous surveys so the patients never need to worry about their identities being shared–they will never be asked for their names or addresses.

How long are the surveys?

Surveys average around 5-10 minutes for completion.

How much money do participants make?

The amount of money earned depends on the type and length of the survey. Patients/registrants are informed how much each survey will earn before they take a survey.

What does YourCareMoments Insights do with the research?

The research is received and analyzed by YourCareMoments. The data is then sold to bio-pharmaceutical companies to help them gain insight to patient healthcare experiences, opinions and habits.

Is YourCareMoments contracted with any pharmaceutical companies?

YourCareMoments works with pharmaceutical companies, but they are not working directly for any specific company or drug.

Will YourCareMoments ever sell or share email addresses?

YourCareMoments will never sell or share participants’ email addresses, and they ensure that all information participants share is safe.

How are participants paid?

Because participants are never asked for names and addresses, they are paid via PayPal within 2-3 business days.

What are some of the questions in the surveys?

Examples include: What medications are you currently taking for your medical condition? Did the doctor prescribe you any new medications or increase your current medication dosage during your visit? Please describe your level of satisfaction with the amount of information provided about your new prescription, etc.

Who can sign up for the program?

Participants must be 18 years or older and living in the United States.

Juvenile Arthritis March, 3/7/15, Bloomington, MN

Bloomington, MN, March 7, 2015

I finally finished editing the photos I took at The Walk to Cure Juvenile Arthritis a couple weekends ago. The event is an annual 5k walk that brings out tons of people to raise money to help find a cure for Juvenile Arthritis and support the kids and families who live with the disease. This was my fifth year photographing the walk for my local Arthritis Foundation chapter, and as always, it was great to see all of the people who participated in the event and to be surrounded by so many people who are dedicated to and passionate about arthritis advocacy.

Here’s a link to the photos if you’re interested:

Walk to Cure Juvenile Arthritis 2015

I, myself, was diagnosed with RA when I was 18 (although I started having symptoms at age 17), so I was on the cusp of juvenile vs adult rheumatoid arthritis. My pediatrician gave me a preliminary diagnosis and immediately sent me to see an adult rheumatologist who I stayed with for the next 10 years. During the end of my teen years and into my 20s, I lived a very isolated and lonely life regarding my RA. I didn’t know any other teenagers or college-age people with the disease and spent these young years battling the physical and emotional pain essentially alone. To say it was hard would be a big understatement.

Volunteering at the walk this year, like the previous years, it made me feel happy to see all of these young people and their families coming together to support each other, and to nurture the friendships and relationships they’ve made over the years, as well as forming new ones. It breaks my heart to think of little kids having to deal with the intense, debilitating pain of RA, but I do feel better knowing that many of them are not alone.

False alarm/gastritis

March 17, 2015

Well, maybe I shouldn’t have said something so soon. Sadly and frustratingly, I’m back on prednisone–5 mg. My right foot and ankle are flaring up again (seriously, what is WRONG with THAT foot and ankle?!). I see my rheumatologist on Thursday so we’ll see what he says about it.

And in other painful health news, I’ve been battling a bad case of gastritis (I think) for over a week. Thanks to omeprazole (Prilosec), and an anti-nausea drug, and severely limiting my diet, it seems to be getting better. What relief! The constant nausea (with some vomiting) and stomach pain has been so horrible. But on the bright side, I have been losing weight. This isn’t exactly the weight loss plan I had imagined for myself, however. Another good forced diet change: no Diet Coke or caffeine!

And in GOOD NEWS, I went on my first bike ride a couple days ago! I had to make a few stops and take breaks (I’m weak from sickness and not eating hardly anything and not exercising all winter), but it felt so good. It was a lot colder out today so I chickened out, but I hope to go on another ride very soon.

Prednisone free!

March 15, 2015

I’ve been off of prednisone for THREE DAYS now! Whooo!

Three days isn’t long, but it’s exciting nonetheless. Let’s hope I can continue to stay off of it.

Goodbye, chubby round face. Goodbye, neck lump. Goodbye, anxiety and mood swings. Goodbye, bone damage.

GOODBYE!

I don’t want to

March 4, 2015

I don’t want to have to get dressed and go out into frigid 7 degree weather now just to pick up a new Vicodin prescription when I’m not feeling well. But, I have to. Remember the good old days (before October) when your doctor could just call in the prescription to your pharmacy? Those days are dead. And I’m really crabby about it. I’m also annoyed by how inconvenient it is to drive and park at my clinic; it’s not a quick and easy trip. It’s a huge hassle. I hope a cup of coffee can give me a little burst of energy to leave the house.

In addition to the daily RA maladies, I’ve been sick with an upper respiratory virus thing since last Thursday–coughing, choking on snot, head about to explode, etc. So I REALLY do not want to have to drive all the way over to the clinic just to physically pick up this piece of paper.

I am thankful that I’m able to even have access to pain medication when many people in my situation aren’t so lucky. All right, I’ll shut up now so I can go get my meds and hopefully do something productive today that isn’t related to managing my health, since I did stay home from work.

But, I really don’t want to move.

Anemia and fatigue

March 4, 2015

I just found out that my hemoglobin level is low again (9). This could explain some things. Like, how I’ve been feeling so dragged-down tired all the time. But it’s often so hard to know what the source of the fatigue is. RA? Sinus problems? Lack of sleep? Depression? Anemia? Pain? Stress? ALL?

So, I’m back popping the iron pills. I hope this helps some.

Flare

February 8, 2015

painpainpain

February, 2015

 

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